Ford 3D prints Shelby Mustang GT 500 parts at new Advanced Manufacturing Center

Ford Motor Co. celebrated the launch of their new Advanced Manufacturing Center on 4 December in America as they look to implement futuristic technologies to boost manufacturing innovation, efficiency, quality, and production.

Billed as a factory of the future, the 45 million 135,000 sq center includes 3D printers, collaborative robots, and virtual and augmented reality simulators which will benefit 100 manufacturing staff looking to innovate with cutting-edge technologies and lead the automotive industry into a new era.

Harold Sears, additive manufacturing technical leader at Ford’s Advanced Manufacturing Center, studies 3D printed parts printed with Desktop Metal's Studio System+.
Harold Sears, additive manufacturing technical leader at Ford’s Advanced Manufacturing Center, studies 3D printed parts that were printed with Desktop Metal’s Studio System+.

3D printers numbering 23 of them from additive manufacturing companies like Stratasys, Desktop Metal, and others are currently being tested at the center for the adaption of vehicle parts manufacturing.

Ford has been a pioneer in the investment and deployment of 3D printing technologies for the past few years, with approximately 30 of its facilities currently housing 3D printers. Among them is the Stratasys Infinite Build 3D Printer which can print large thermoplastic parts with high reliability and repeatability.

Harold Sears, additive manufacturing technical leader at Ford’s Advanced Manufacturing Center, holding the 3D printed brake bracket of the Mustang GT500. (Photo: Mandi Wright, Detroit Free Press)
Harold Sears, additive manufacturing technical leader at Ford’s Advanced Manufacturing Center, holding the 3D printed brake bracket of the Mustang GT500. (Photo: Mandi Wright, Detroit Free Press)

The upcoming Ford Shelby Mustang GT500 which will be introduced at the North American International Auto Show on 14 January 2019, will come with two 3D printed brackets. The bracket is a part that holds the brake line and supplies hydraulic pressure to the wheel brake upon depressing the brake pedal.

With the cutting-edge technologies in place at their new center, Ford is reinventing tomorrow’s assembly line to change how vehicles are mass-produced, just like how they created the moving assembly line more than 100 years ago.